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1924 VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOK
1942 VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOK
1950 VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOK
COMPARISON CHART OF THE VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOKS FROM 1924, 1942, and 1950
RARE BLENDED 1924 / 1942 BOXCAR CHILDREN STORY FEATURED IN VINTAGE 1938 CHILD LIFE MAGAZINE SERIES
THE BOXCAR CHILDREN VINTAGE PAPER DOLLS
THE HOUSE OF DELIGHT GERTRUDE WARNER 1916 ~ SCARCE
THE GERTRUDE C. WARNER BOXCAR CHILDREN MUSEUM
THE BOXCAR CHILDREN GRAPHIC NOVELS SERIES
THE BOXCAR CHILDREN

You can find this picture in the book entitled, " The Boxcar Children, 60th Anniversary Edition "
Copyright © 2002 Albert Whitman and Company


Gertrude Chandler Warner and Her Boxcar Children
A child's dream, turned into one of the greatest children series ever written.
The birth and the heart of the wonderful... Boxcar Children Series.

It all began with the dreams and thoughts of a little girl named, Gertrude Chandler Warner, of whom, cherished the thought of living and playing house in a boxcar or a caboose. Warner's thoughts of this were sparked from living so close to a train station in her hometown of Putnam, Connecticut. She could see the box cars from her home and something about them always triggered an interest in her mind and heart!

She spent countless hours watching the trains go by. Occasionally, she was able to peak through the windows of a caboose and see a small stove, a table, cups and even a coffee pot. The things that she saw fascinated her so much, that she would dream about how much fun it would be to live in a boxcar.   It was these childhood dreams that became her inspiration for the books that she would go onto author, The Boxcar Children.

Since the young age of only five years old, Warner had dreamed of becoming an author.  Her favorite book to read was the ever popular, "Alice's  Adventure In Wonderland." At the age of nine, Warner wrote her very first book, entitled, "Golliwogg At The Zoo". She actually illustrated it with her very own water colors. This book was extra special to her Grandfather Carpenter, because she gave it to him as a Christmas gift. Warner then made it her own little tradition, to write her own handmade books, and give them to her grandfather every Christmas. 

During her childhood, Warner had frequent illnesses and poor health. For this reason, she was unable to finish public high school. So, during her sophomore year she began being tutored at home. Later, in 1918, when male teachers were called to serve in World War I, the school board asked her to teach first grade.  She taught in that same classroom for thirty-two years, before retiring at the age of sixty in order to have more time to write.

It was in 1924 when Warner first published her original and very first version of the famous book entitled, The Boxcar Children.  This 1924, very first original edition was published by Rand McNally and Company.  Gertrude later said that the book, "raised a storm of protest from librarians who thought that the children were having too good of a time without parental control."  Warner, with an honest heart, would joyfully go on to state.... "that is exactly why children like it."
 
 
 

 
In 1936,  and again many years later, Gertrude went to work for Scott Foresman and Company.  During that time she helped to develop a new series of easy readers for children who had trouble with the regular school reading books.  At this time, she also began working on a new version of her book entitled, The Boxcar Children.  This new version was written in a childish-like language in an easier vocabulary and lower reading level.  It had a prescribed and controlled vocabulary of only six hundred words. This new version became the 1942 edition published by, Scott Foresman and Company.  Warner had hoped to reach poor readers who might be struggling with reading. It was with the 1942 edition that this series really took off, and became one of the most popular and well-loved readers by many children! The storyline in the 1942 edition is the version that majority of the people are familiar with today.
 

 
This very same, strict and controlled vocabulary followed the direct style and word-usage as in the original Dick and Jane Series.  Of which, were also published by, Scott Foresman and Company.  This made, The Boxcar Children, reader even more enjoyable for the children, because it had many familiar words, of which they had learned from the Dick and Jane Basic Readers.  So, not only did the children thoroughly enjoy, The Boxcar Children, story, but they also gained huge confidence in their reading capabilities, upon successfully completing the book.  This success encouraged children everywhere to begin reading more books, of which, was exactly what Gertrude had wanted to accomplish when she set out to revise her book, "The Boxcar Children."
 

 
The copyright was renewed again in 1950 with Scott Foresman and Company.  Eventually, Albert Whitman and Company, went on to buy and own the copyright to this extremely successful series.  Albert Whitman and Company are still the copyright holders to this day!

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Note:  Tiny Town Books and Toys, is in no way affiliated or endorsed by Albert Whitman and Company.
 
 

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