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1924 VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOK
1942 VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOK
1950 VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOK
COMPARISON CHART OF THE VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOKS FROM 1924, 1942, and 1950
RARE BLENDED 1924 / 1942 BOXCAR CHILDREN STORY FEATURED IN VINTAGE 1938 CHILD LIFE MAGAZINE SERIES
THE BOXCAR CHILDREN VINTAGE PAPER DOLLS
THE HOUSE OF DELIGHT GERTRUDE WARNER 1916 ~ SCARCE
THE GERTRUDE C. WARNER BOXCAR CHILDREN MUSEUM
THE BOXCAR CHILDREN GRAPHIC NOVELS SERIES
COMPARISON CHART OF THE VINTAGE BOXCAR CHILDREN BOOKS FROM 1924, 1942, and 1950
Here are the comparisons between the (1924) edition  and the (1942 / 1950) editions, of the vintage Boxcar Children books, by Gertrude Chandler Warner. You will see that there were vast differences between the editions!

The Table of Contents;

The 1924 edition has 17 chapters.  The 1942 & 1950 editions only have
13 chapters. The titles of each chapter are different as well. Here they are:


          1924 Edition:       
1. The Flight
2. The Second Night
3. Shelter
4. A New Home
5. Housekeeping
6. Earning A Living
7. At Home
8. Building The Dam
9. Cherry Picking
10. The Race
11. More Education
12. Ginseng
13. Trouble
14. Caught
15. A New Grandfather
16. A United Family
17. Safe


1942 and 1950 Editions:
1. The Four Hungry Children
2. Night is Turned Into Day
3. A New Home In The Woods
4. Henry Has Two Surprises
5. The Explorers Find Treasure
6. A Queer Noise In The Night
  7. A Big Meal From Little Onions
8. A Swimming Pool At Last
9. Fun In The Cherry Orchard
10. Henry and The Free-For-All
11. The Doctor Takes A Hand
12. James Henry and Henry James
13. A New Home For The Box Car


Although there are more chapters in the 1924 edition,  there are actually
less pages! The reason for this is because the text is a different font and
it is significantly smaller!


In the 1924 edition there are 146 pages plus four original color lithographs
by Dorothy Lake Gregory!  In the 1942 and 1950 editions there are 154
pages and a total of 40 black and white illustrations that range from very
small to a full page in size.

About the 1924 edition, Illustrator: Dorothy Lake Gregory


(1893 - 1970) ~ Born in Brooklyn, NY. As a teenager, Gregory was already
quite an artist doing professional line drawings of children for a local paper.

She enrolled at the Pratt Institute in New York & studied at the Art Student League with Robert Henri. This is where she happened to meet her future husband, Ross Moffett. Then in 1914, Gregory went to Provincetown, to specifically study with Charles Hawthorne! It was there in Provincetown,
where her relationship with Ross Moffett really developed. Their marriage
lasted for nearly fifty-one years!

Gregory's art expressed a tremendous range of styles and mediums. She
was a huge success as an illustrator, with over 20 books, & many magazines.

She is best known for the paintings and lithographs that she did of,
Alice In Wonderland.  Some of her lithos,  paintings, and other fine arts
are highly collectible and have a tendency to bring in premium prices!

Gregory exhibited at many prestigious places, including the National
Academy of Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and The Art Institute
of Chicago. Plus she won several awards and prizes! Her artwork can be
found in the permanent collections of the Boston Museum of Fine Art and
The Library of Congress in Washington D.C.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Another fascinating thing about the 1924 edition, is that some
of the names were different than the 1942 and 1950 editions!

Here are the name comparisons:

         1924                                                   1942 & 1950
  Edition                                                  
   Editions
Henry                                                       Henry
Jess                                                       Jessie
Violet                                                       Violet
Benny                                                       Benny
Dr. McAllister                                             Dr. Moore
Grandpa:                                                   Grandpa:
    James Henry Cordyce                                James Henry Alden


Many do not even know that the dog in the story, named “Watch”. is an
Airedale!  As stated in the 1924 edition! And “Watch’s” original name
that he was given, while still owned by the kennel man, before he was
even found and named by the Boxcar Children… was originally “Rough
No. 3”.   ~ It wasn’t until after the Boxcar Children found him, that they
named him “Watch”! Another note about “Watch“, is that in the 1924 edition,
when the kennel owner man came looking for him and began to identify the
dog,  he stated that  “he has a black spot inside his ear”,  where-as in the
1942 and 1950 editions, he states that “he has a black spot on his foot”.
Also, in the 1924 edition it speaks of the 200 Airedales that the kennel
owner has, and how their dog (Watch), was sold to a lady the day before
he ran away. Whereas the 1942 and 1950 editions do not speak anything
about the 200 Airedales or the kennel, and they state; the dog ran
away from the lady he was sold to, “that very day”.

Another thing completely different in the 1924 edition verses the 1942
and 1950 edition, is the beginning of the story! The 1924 edition, is what
is considered by some to be kind-of grim or sad, for a children’s reader
of this age level.  However, when Ms. Warner first wrote this book, she
intended it to be for all ages (pre-reading up to college)!  Her main goal
was to get the children interested, of which would encourage them to
read more! And truthfully, if you really think about it, any of the versions
could be considered a grim or sad beginning, due to the boxcar
children’s parents dying.. Of which lead them to be orphans in the
first place! Although, the 1924 edition, does have a little bit more
in-depth details that give you a much better understanding of The
Boxcar Children’s beginning! Which is something that the later
editions, basically left unanswered, thus sparking curiosity in the
minds of many of the readers of this series. Here is a little insight:

The beginning of this 1924 edition basically sets the situation off, as...
the mother is already dead. The father and the children arrive to this new
town. Their father is a drunk (and not healthy). The very next day, their father
is dead. The children go to the baker and his wife for help, as to what to do.
Upon them all going to sleep, Jess heard the baker’s wife tell the baker that
they will need to contact the children’s grandfather, so that he can take care
of the children.

However, the children… think and  fear that their grandfather is mean and
that he does not like them, based on a past occurrence, that is explained
in this 1924 edition!  Therefore, the children decide to sneak out while the
baker and his wife are asleep, and they run away… of which ends up
leading them to an empty boxcar, that becomes their home.

As for the 1942 and 1950 editions, the beginning of the story simply starts
out that the children’s parents are already both deceased!  Thus they are
already orphans right from the start. Their Father is not actively in these
later editions, as he was in the first original 1924 edition! The children end
up running away because they over-hear the baker’s wife saying that she
wants to keep the older children only, (but not Benny - the youngest child),
in order to have them help do her chores,  while they  try to find the
children's grandfather. The baker's wife wants to take the youngest child,
Benny, to the children’s home. So, out of fear of that happening, and of the
fear they have of their grandfather, the children run away!!! Keep in mind,
that the baker and his wife also have different personalities and play
different roles, (to a certain extent) in both the 1924 edition, verses the
later editions! That's what makes the beginning of the story take a
different turn as well.


Here are some other noticiable differences between the
original 1924 edition and the later editions of this book title:

The girls cut their hair. “Violet’s dark curls came off first! Jess’s chestnut
hair was long, and silky, and nicely braided, but she never murmured
as it came off too”  *** (This was never mentioned in the (1942 & 1950)
later editions)!!!  

The Irish cook made “Cherry Slump”, which is, “a rare combination
of dumplings beaten with stoned cherries, and gently cooked in the
juice of the Oxheart cherries in a real cherry year!"  *** (This was
simply called "cherry dumplings" in the later editions.... and with very
little descritpion).

Henry kept a detailed budget. The things he purchased along with their
prices are listed in the 1924 edition. *** (No budget or spending list
was mentioned in the later editions)!!!

Benny’s beloved PINK CUP is described in great detail, giving you
an extremely vivid, visual of it. “It was a tea-party cup of bright
rose-color with a wreath of gorgeous roses on it and a little
shepherdess giving her lamb a drink from a pale blue brook.
With gold on the handle. It’s only flaw was a crack through
the lamb’s nose and front feet
." *** (In the later [1942 & 1950] editions,
it was merely described as: "he held up a pink cup. There was a big crack
in it, but it had a handle", “this will be my pink cup",
said Benny. ~ (as you
can see, the later version had much less details than the 1924 edition).

Benny’s (Teddy) bear is described in GREAT DETAIL and his new
homemade, (by his sister) bear was named “Ginseng", because the
children had sold some ginseng in order to buy Benny new stockings,
from which, Jess made his bear from. *** (The later editions speak of;
his new homemade, (by his sister) bear was named “Stockings”
after Benny’s stockings)!

Benny was given a pony by his grandfather, just before his grandfather
surprised the children by bringing the boxcar onto his property for them.
The book goes into great detail describing Benny’s pony & his first ride
on it. The pony’s name was “Cracker”, because he was born on Fourth
of July when the firecrackers were going off. *** (There was No
mention about any pony in the later editions)!!!

Grandfather told Henry that he was going to take his place as president
of the steel mills when he grows up. Of which the grandfather owned,
called: Cordyce Steel Mills. *** (There was No mention of Henry taking
over grandfather's business in any of the later editions)!!!!

The old freight car was placed & stayed, in a beautiful Italian garden,
next to the fountain on Mr. Cordyces property (yard)! *** (The garden
was not referred to as an "Italian Garden" in the later editions)!!!

Mr. Henry James Crodyce (the grandfather) was 60 years old. His
hair was dark brown, without any gray!  *** (No details were given
about the grandfather's age or hair color, etc. in the later editions)!

These examples of the differences are only a few,
of the many that you will find in these books!



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